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Posts sent on: 2016-01-31

Jan312016

How to dry out and fix a wet, water-damaged iPhone or iPad

Hopefully the steps above helped you revive the drowned iPhone in your life, but are there steps to help us avoid the situation in future? Yes, there are.

Apologies if this sounds patronising, but step one is to keep your devices dry. Water's not good for iPhones and iPads, penetrating deep within their circuitry and leading to damaging short circuits. So those (extremely common) hazards so many iPhone owners risk - taking photos on the beach, browsing the web in the bath, even reading email on the loo - are best avoided. Most of us only cotton on to the dangers after our first soaked iPhone.

We're all human, however, and things get dropped, so it's best to anticipate this. If you really want to use your iPad to read ebooks by the pool or in the bath, consider buying a waterproof case.Have a look at your options in our cases roundups: Best waterproof iPhone cases, Best waterproof iPad cases, Best iPhone cases and Best iPad cases.

Another option to bear in mind is some kind of handle or wrist strap so that you're less likely to drop the device in the first place.

A handy emergency package to have around - obviously it's best to have it ready in advance, instead of waiting for the crisis to occur and then queueing at the shops - is Kensington's EVAP. It's available for an apparently discounted 4.50 at time of writing, but that still seemspretty expensive for what you get:effectively aslightly slickerversion of the silica gel trick above. Worth consideration, nevertheless.

See also: How to repair a cracked iPhone screen; 5 fixes for a broken smartphone display


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